LS XR4046 Tractor Review

See also “LS XG3025 Tractor Review”


Vegetable Gardens From The 1800s

Vegetable Gardening for Beginners


When Rabbits Invade Your Garden

Yes, rabbits are marble eyed, floppy eared, fuzz balls of cuteness. They are fun to watch bounce across your back yard, however it is what they do when you aren’t looking that can be frustrating. They have no respect for boundaries or  that garden you have been slaving away in all summer. Rabbits have two bad habits-chewing and swallowing. They love your flowers, your green beans, your blossoms. To a rabbit, rows in a garden are like isles in a grocery store. Learning early on how to prevent rabbits from gobbling up your harvest is something every gardener must to do. So to prevent them from getting fat off of your hard labor, we’ve compiled a list of tips and products designed to aide you in safekeeping your fruits and vegetables from rabbits and other garden predators. Image result for rabbit in garden

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LS XG3025 Tractor Review




See also “Husky 22 Ton Log Splitter Review”


When Neighbors Collide- The City vs The Country






Robert Frost said "Good fences make good neighbors."good neighbors2

It was a gorgeous property that had recently sold. 10 acres of blooming redbuds and dogwoods, a small pond stocked with catfish and bass and a beautiful newer two story brick home waiting for the next owner. It was cradled by rolling hills and valleys with a scenic county road landscaped with farms and homesteads that created something akin to the opening scene of a movie.

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GMOs In You and Your Livestock-The 21st Century Body Snatchers

raw milkFrito-Lay, Oscar Meyer, Cargill, Kellog, Pepsi Cola, Purina and Tyson are some of the leading producers of the American daily diet.   For tens of millions, a bowl of Capn Crunch and a glass of Sunny Delite for breakfast, McDonalds for lunch and Totino's Pizza for dinner is the norm. Yet the irony is that many people consider raw milk, farm raised unrefrigerated eggs and organic grown vegetables not approved or regulated by the FDA to be risky. We have become a society that balances a Big Mac and a large Coke with a Walmart salad. A Sara Lee Pie is the whiskey and  Slimfast an aspirin for the hangover.



 

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Quick & Simple Homemade Vanilla Extract





Quick & Simple Homemade Vanilla Extract
Nothing brings our family closer than spending the morning or afternoon stirring up an old favorite recipe in the kitchen. We really value our time spent together, therefore, our oven/stovetop is quite busy! From pancakes and waffles to cakes and cookies, we do it all and nearly on a daily basis at times. As a mother with an old-fashioned outlook on life, I find it crucial that my toddler understands the fundamentals when it comes to the importance of each ingredient as well as the science behind cooking.

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When Your Spouse Doesn’t Like Deer Meat

When Your Spouse Doesn't Like Deer Meat






It’s that time of year again. Your husband has donned his camo, spent countless hours scouting, following trails and looking for “scrapes” and “rubs” on trees. He’s painstakingly searched for just the right tree to hang his stand, doused himself in every sort of synthetic deer excrement on the market, and loaded his shotgun with the best shells money can buy. All to accomplish what he’s waited all year to do. Yes, you guessed it, to bring home his prized buck or doe and fill the freezer with delicious, nutritious, and healthy venison!

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Preventing Livestock Water Containers From Freezing

Preventing Livestock Water Containers From Freezing





Tips For "Chicken Winter"

14 Day Pickle Recipe and Garden Tips

14 day pickle recipe and garden tips with a brief preview video for the best practices of growing, maintaining, picking and storing cucumbers.





courtesy of foodfarmerearth

14 Day Pickles – Full Recipe

Here is the full recipe for Grandma Ida’s 14 Day Pickles. I hope you enjoy these as much as our family does.

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Back Roads Kentucky Knife Maker

A Kentucky knife maker from Jessamine County who takes us through the steps of crafting a knife. Nick Peel is a real craftsman doing tremendous work in Kentucky! 





Courtesy of KYAfield
See also "Tapering A Table Leg Using a Joiner"

Was Jesus Really Born At Christmas?

Was Jesus really born at Christmas? Tune in for some humorous and fun factual anecdotes that you might not have been aware of. 





courtesy oflaughing historically
See also "Hot Chocolate In The 19th Century"

Caring For Your Chickens During Winter





A  few quick helps for those folks experiencing their first winter with chickens and a quick refresher for the veterans as temperatures drop. Caring for your chickens during winter isn't intended as an exhaustive list and your location and situation may be unique, so consider this a general guide.

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  • Late fall is a common time for chickens to molt. Don't freak if you are finding mounds of feathers in your coop. They aren't having knock down drag out fights while you sleep. It is normal for a chicken to experience their first molting period around a year and a half. Their feathers will return in as little as three weeks or as much as a few months.
  • Do not insulate your chicken coop. The natural tendency is we want to ensure our chickens are warm, but sealing a chicken coop is a recipe for a homemade gas chamber. Air circulation in their structure is vital to their winter health. Chickens expel moisture in their breath; a group of hens in an enclosed area will increase moisture levels in the air, which can freeze during sub zero temperatures and can lead to frostbite. Condensation on henhouse windows is a sign that there is too much humidity. Air movement is also vital when the droppings "pile up". Cleaning their coop isn't always practical or even possible during the dead of winter. Chicken feces produces ammonia, which is of course harmful to your birds and can irritate their lungs. Our coop happens to be an old garden shed, with a few cracks in the walls and gaps between the boards. It might not be inviting for you or me, but it allows a continual flow of fresh air inside.
  • Have at least one heated water bowl available to your chickens. We keep one both outside and inside their coop. Chickens will need water regardless of temperature and activity, but the frozen stuff does them no good. The larger the bowl the better. img_0153
  • Heat lamps are tempting when you are looking out your kitchen window during a January blizzard, imagining yourself frozen to a roosting pole, but they aren't always the best thing for your birds. Yes, they may be needed during the bitterest of nights, but most of the time they will do more harm than good. Chickens, like most any other creature do a pretty good job of adapting to the climate, but a heat lamp will inhibit a chicken's ability to tolerate the cold more than help and once they begin to depend on it, they will tend to remain indoors. The risk to their health will also increase if the power should ever fail and the lamp goes out.
  • During severe and/or extended freezing temperatures, chickens can experience frostbite along their combs and waddles (the red growths on their head and below their chins). A dab of vaseline or even something like coconut oil rubbed along the exterior can go a long way to preventing frostbite in your flock.   They typically will stand on one foot when outside during the winter as a means of staying warm. This is typical and doesn't necessarily mean they are in distress, however you can also apply vaseline to the leg and talon. It isn't fool proof and you will still need to monitor your birds for signs of frostbite  ie discoloration, swelling, bleeding.
  • It is true that Chickens do get cabin fever. Boredom will result from the limitations of snow, frozen ground, and a general lack of exercise. You may even see increased signs of aggressiveness and fighting. A few things in the yard or inside their coop, such as a chicken swing, or a walmart bag with some greens or vegetables hung from the ceiling by a string (like a pinata) will do a lot to break up the monotony. It gives them something to do besides peck each other on the head. hanging-treat
  • img_0147Gather eggs as soon as you possible can. A frozen egg can crack and once it is indoors and thawed can allow bacteria to grow inside of the egg. If you have any doubts about an egg's condition, throw it out.
  • Keep their bedding fresh and deep and dry. While it is okay for a chicken coop to be a bit "drafty" it is key that it remain dry during winter. This means anything from roof leaks, to standing water on the floor to soiled bedding. Your hens and roosters should not have any exterior contact with moisture inside their shelters.

For more about chickens